alex cuccovia

just because
8bitfuture:

New flexible solar cells are thinner than spider silk.
Austrian scientists have developed flexible, stretchable solar cells on thin plastic foil substrates, able to generate a record 10 watts per gram. The cells have a 4.2% power conversion efficiency, which puts it ahead of this flexible solar system I covered earlier this week. Typical solar panels have around 12-17% efficiency.
The above image shows the cells being wrapped around a human hair only 70 microns wide. The cells are based on a commercially available substrate of PET film, with the total device measuring 1.9 microns thick - around a quarter of the thickness of traditional solar cells.

Creative little Aussies

8bitfuture:

New flexible solar cells are thinner than spider silk.

Austrian scientists have developed flexible, stretchable solar cells on thin plastic foil substrates, able to generate a record 10 watts per gram. The cells have a 4.2% power conversion efficiency, which puts it ahead of this flexible solar system I covered earlier this week. Typical solar panels have around 12-17% efficiency.

The above image shows the cells being wrapped around a human hair only 70 microns wide. The cells are based on a commercially available substrate of PET film, with the total device measuring 1.9 microns thick - around a quarter of the thickness of traditional solar cells.

Creative little Aussies

(via 8bitfuture)

8bitfuture:

Printable solar cells could turn anything into an energy source.
A team at MIT has developed a process to ‘print’ solar cells onto almost any surface. Using chemical vapour deposition, the process uses “abundant organic molecules” to convert about 2 percent of the available energy into light. Typical solar panels are around 12-17% efficient, but the team thinks 10% efficiency is achievable.

The cost of installing panels keeps many people from adopting solar power, Barr says. By integrating it into ordinary materials, he thinks he can clear that hurdle. “You’re already hanging a curtain in your house,” he says. “Why not add some energy to that?”



Amazing

8bitfuture:

Printable solar cells could turn anything into an energy source.

A team at MIT has developed a process to ‘print’ solar cells onto almost any surface. Using chemical vapour deposition, the process uses “abundant organic molecules” to convert about 2 percent of the available energy into light. Typical solar panels are around 12-17% efficient, but the team thinks 10% efficiency is achievable.

The cost of installing panels keeps many people from adopting solar power, Barr says. By integrating it into ordinary materials, he thinks he can clear that hurdle. “You’re already hanging a curtain in your house,” he says. “Why not add some energy to that?”

Amazing

(Source: businessweek.com, via emergentfutures)

futuramb:

3-D printing, copyright, and intellectual property. - Slate Magazine

Fortunately, a technology on the verge of going mainstream will soon give us a chance to re-examine the role that copyright plays in our lives. By connecting the physical and the digital, 3-D printers remind us that copyright is not a general-purpose legal right that allows people to demand control over whatever they want. Instead, copyright has a narrow scope. And most of the things that make up our world simply do not fall into it.

This article is important in two respects. It puts the finger on the really strange development that copyright and other IPR regulations have become to be seen as a general principle covering everything around us - a completely new and unintended way of organizing the world which moves a huge amount of power from the individuals to organizations with the deepest pockets and/or the best layers. But it also points out that this positions is going to be dramatically challenged when 3D-printing enters the arena as a generally available technology.


Can’t wait

futuramb:

3-D printing, copyright, and intellectual property. - Slate Magazine

Fortunately, a technology on the verge of going mainstream will soon give us a chance to re-examine the role that copyright plays in our lives. By connecting the physical and the digital, 3-D printers remind us that copyright is not a general-purpose legal right that allows people to demand control over whatever they want. Instead, copyright has a narrow scope. And most of the things that make up our world simply do not fall into it.

This article is important in two respects. It puts the finger on the really strange development that copyright and other IPR regulations have become to be seen as a general principle covering everything around us - a completely new and unintended way of organizing the world which moves a huge amount of power from the individuals to organizations with the deepest pockets and/or the best layers. But it also points out that this positions is going to be dramatically challenged when 3D-printing enters the arena as a generally available technology.

Can’t wait

(via emergentfutures)

smarterplanet:

VertiCrop Processes 10,000 Plants Every 3 Days Using Vertical Hydroponic Farming

forget outdoor farming people, this is the future!!! skyscraper farms is the way to go…controlled environments, no heat, no cold, no bugs, no sprays!!!

Vertical farming is one of the most innovative solutions for lowering the amount of energy, space, and water needed to grow food, but Valcent Products has taken the practice to a whole new level with their revolutionary VertiCrop technology. By applying Henry Ford’s super-efficient assembly line concept to vertical hydroponic farming, the Vancouver-based firm can produce the same amount of produce on a standard sized residential lot that most farmers would be able to grow on a 16-acre plot. Their stacked, mechanized, produce-laden plastic trays are already a hot commodity, with orders coming in from every corner of the globe. Step in for a closer look at how this technology is completely changing the way we grow food.

The VertiCrop system consists of a series of mechanical 123 plastic trays stacked 8 high that can be placed on urban rooftops and other tight spaces. They contain vegetables and herbs that are grown hydroponically with just 8% of the water and 5% of the space required by standard farms. Energy efficient LED lights are on standby to supplement waning natural light when necessary.

VertiCrops are climate controlled and use absolutely no harmful herbicides or pesticides. What’s more, they are incredibly easy to manage. A staff of just 3 people can handle 4,000 square feet of plants and 2,000 square feet of germinating, harvesting, and packing space, and they can process as many as 10,000 plants every 3 days! Valcent’s COO Christopher Ng told the Global Commodities Report, “this is what farming has to develop into.”

via mattmeetstheinternetforeverdante:

This is awesome.

(via futurescope)

fuckyeahbrutalism:

Canton School, Schaffhausen, Switzerland, 1963-66
(Walter M. Förderer, Hans Zwimpfer)

This is the shit

fuckyeahbrutalism:

Canton School, Schaffhausen, Switzerland, 1963-66

(Walter M. Förderer, Hans Zwimpfer)

This is the shit